“A Silence that Pours Love”, a poem from L.Willows

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A Silence that Pours Love

Dwelling, love swelling from silence that pours
sweetened so mellow, in the cavern’s surround.
Here in the mound that so softly receives.
Here in the curve of my heart in God found.

Misted, lifted, oh blessed by the dear gift,
carried by kindness, unspoken prayers heard.
Here is the home that turns all towards you.
Here is the beat of my heart in God’s word.

Stayed, assured; with rest in the calm.
Lullabies sing to my soul with Your psalms.
Comfort is dwelling, love swelling – it pours,
sweetened by the caverns’ mound silent surround
here in the curve of my heart, God found.

© 2018 Linda Willows

But the LORD is in his holy temple; let all the earth be silent before him.
Habakkuk 2:20

Be still and know that I am God.
Psalm 46:10

In repentance and rest is your salvation, in quietness and trust is your strength.
Isaiah 30:15

Find rest, O my soul, in God alone.
Psalm 62:5

The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not be in want. He makes me lie down in green pastures, he leads me beside quiet waters, he restores my soul.
Psalm 23:1-3

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“The Lord is my Sheperd” Psalm 23 with Commentary by Charles H. Spurgeon

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Psalm 23
The Lord Is My Shepherd
A Psalm of David

The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
2 He makes me lie down in green pastures.
He leads me beside still waters.
3 He restores my soul.
He leads me in paths of righteousness
for his name’s sake.

4 Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
I will fear no evil,
for you are with me;
your rod and your staff,
they comfort me.

5 You prepare a table before me
in the presence of my enemies;
you anoint my head with oil;
my cup overflows.
6 Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me
all the days of my life,
and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord
forever.

Charles H. Spurgeon’s Treasury of David
Psalm 23

Exposition

There is no inspired title to this psalm, and none is needed, for it records no special event, and needs no other key than that which every Christian may find in his own bosom. It is David’s Heavenly Pastoral; a surpassing ode, which none of the daughters of music can excel. The clarion of war here gives place to the pipe of peace, and he who so lately bewailed the woes of the Shepherd tunefully rehearses the joys of the flock. Sitting under a spreading tree, with his flock around him, like Bunyan’s shepherd-boy in the Valley of Humiliation, we picture David singing this unrivalled pastoral with a heart as full of gladness as it could hold; or, if the psalm be the product of his after-years, we are sure that his soul returned in contemplation to the lonely water-brooks which rippled among the pastures of the wilderness, where in early days she had been wont to dwell. This is the pearl of psalms whose soft and pure radiance delights every eye; a pearl of which Helicon need not be ashamed, though Jordan claims it. Of this delightful song it may be affirmed that its piety and its poetry are equal, its sweetness and its spirituality are unsurpassed.

The position of this psalm is worthy of notice. It follows the twenty-second, which is peculiarly the Psalm of the Cross. There are no green pastures, no still waters on the other side of the twenty-second psalm. It is only after we have read, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” that we come to “The Lord is my Shepherd.” We must by experience know the value of blood-shedding, and see the sword awakened against the Shepherd, before we shall be able truly to know the Sweetness of the good Shepherd’s care.

It has been said that what the nightingale is among birds, that is this divine ode among the psalms, for it has sung sweetly in the ear of many a mourner in his night of weeping, and has bidden him hope for a morning of joy. I will venture to compare it also to the lark, which sings as it mounts, and mounts as it sings, until it is out of sight, and even then is not out of hearing. Note the last words of the psalm–“I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever;” these are celestial notes, more fitted for the eternal mansions than for these dwelling places below the clouds. Oh that we may enter into the spirit of the psalm as we read it, and then we shall experience the days of heaven upon the earth!

Link to Spurgeon’s Exposition of Psalm 23 here! Spurgeon Exposition on Psalm 23

Psalm-139:1-12 “Search me O God and Know my Heart”….photo Bible inspire from LWillows

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